theunderestimator:

Christiane F. photographed by Ilse Ruppert in her room in Hamburg (1983).

   Christiane F., a onetime heroin-addicted teen prostitute, a junkie from the age of 12,  was put in the spotlight in her early teens during the late `70s, after a series of interviews about her life and West Berlin`s drug scene, which led in a top-selling book and a film (Christiane F. – Wir Kinder vom Bahnhof Zoo”) based on her memoirs.

Her intriguing story, as well as her great looks instantly turned her into a media darling and a kind of controversial heroin-chic celebrity.

   Along Alexander Hacke, her boyfriend at the time and member of the German industrial band Einstürzende Neubauten, they recorded two albums and also appeared in a film.

themorty:

Roarie | roarieyum by themorty

themorty:

Roarie | roarieyum by themorty

nprfreshair:

Originally Jesse Pinkman was supposed to be killed off Breaking Bad during the show’s first season. Aaron Paul says he didn’t learn that until series creator Vince Gilligan called him over one day during lunch.
"He goes, ‘Originally Jesse was supposed to die at the end of this season,’ … and instantly my heart dropped and slowed down a bit," Paul says. "And he said, ‘We don’t think we’re going to do that anymore.’ "
Gilligan told Paul that he loved the chemistry between Walt and Jesse.
"He decided to change the whole dynamic of their relationship and really the whole dynamic of the show," says Paul. "But the entire second season, the entire third season, I thought that Jesse could be a goner at any moment because there’s many things that this character could screw up on, and he could definitely meet his deathbed at any moment."
Other cast members, including Bryan Cranston, would joke around on set with Paul about his character’s potential demise.
"Bryan would come up and give me a hug and say, ‘I’m not going to say anything but it was such a pleasure working with you. It’s been an amazing past year-and-a-half, and you have a huge career ahead of you,’ " he says. "They would always joke around about it. They’ve kind of slowed down about it, but who knows — this kid could die at any second."
Hear the interview with Aaron Paul 

nprfreshair:

Originally Jesse Pinkman was supposed to be killed off Breaking Bad during the show’s first season. Aaron Paul says he didn’t learn that until series creator Vince Gilligan called him over one day during lunch.

"He goes, ‘Originally Jesse was supposed to die at the end of this season,’ … and instantly my heart dropped and slowed down a bit," Paul says. "And he said, ‘We don’t think we’re going to do that anymore.’ "

Gilligan told Paul that he loved the chemistry between Walt and Jesse.

"He decided to change the whole dynamic of their relationship and really the whole dynamic of the show," says Paul. "But the entire second season, the entire third season, I thought that Jesse could be a goner at any moment because there’s many things that this character could screw up on, and he could definitely meet his deathbed at any moment."

Other cast members, including Bryan Cranston, would joke around on set with Paul about his character’s potential demise.

"Bryan would come up and give me a hug and say, ‘I’m not going to say anything but it was such a pleasure working with you. It’s been an amazing past year-and-a-half, and you have a huge career ahead of you,’ " he says. "They would always joke around about it. They’ve kind of slowed down about it, but who knows — this kid could die at any second."

Hear the interview with Aaron Paul 

black-coffee-bonus-cup:

Ian Mackaye & Henry Rollins

black-coffee-bonus-cup:

Ian Mackaye & Henry Rollins

theunderestimator:

Paul Simonon & Mick Jones of The Clash, Glen Matlock of The Sex Pistols & members of Steel Pulse demonstrating outside National Front Leader Martin Webster’s house in 1977 (photographed by Caroline Coon).
"Wedlock In Dreadlock": The punk & reggae connection weekly tribute (pt 6)

"…Black and white unite in staging an anti-racism demonstration outside the headquarters of the National Front in early 1977. The protest, a year before the Rock Against Racism concert in Victoria Park, united white punk with black roots reggae.  The two genres of music were booming in the UK at this time. A combination of huge cuts in welfare by a Labour Government under pressure, wage freezes and mass unemployment, along with the uninspiring glam rock and disco that dominated the radio during the mid 1970s, proved to be the perfect breeding ground for the political and religious messages of punk and roots reggae…”
(via)

(More stuff on "Wedlock In Dreadlock": The punk & reggae connection weekly tribute, here)

theunderestimator:

Paul Simonon & Mick Jones of The Clash, Glen Matlock of The Sex Pistols & members of Steel Pulse demonstrating outside National Front Leader Martin Webster’s house in 1977 (photographed by Caroline Coon).

"Wedlock In Dreadlock": The punk & reggae connection weekly tribute (pt 6)

"…Black and white unite in staging an anti-racism demonstration outside the headquarters of the National Front in early 1977. The protest, a year before the Rock Against Racism concert in Victoria Park, united white punk with black roots reggae.

The two genres of music were booming in the UK at this time. A combination of huge cuts in welfare by a Labour Government under pressure, wage freezes and mass unemployment, along with the uninspiring glam rock and disco that dominated the radio during the mid 1970s, proved to be the perfect breeding ground for the political and religious messages of punk and roots reggae…”

(via)

(More stuff on "Wedlock In Dreadlock": The punk & reggae connection weekly tribute, here)